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 Astigmatism

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Alis grave nil, pax



Posts : 25
Join date : 2009-09-22

PostSubject: Astigmatism   Tue Oct 06, 2009 11:20 am

I have a very high astigmatism and I have had glasses since I was six months old. In fifth grade I was told I would have to have surgery to help correct my vision, so that my eyes would continue to grow correctly. I went to the eye doctor and they told me I would have to take off a month of school for recovery. I was told there was a chance I might go blind. This realization made me contemplate life in a new fashion even at a young age.
The surgery itself took 3 hours. I don’t remember any of it, but I do remember waking up from it, groggy with my head completely bound like a mummy. They had put stitches in my eye, which was the hardest thing to deal with because it felt like un-removable sand was in my eye for two weeks.
The surgery was relatively successful and my eyes are continuing to grow in the correct direction, but I will never have perfect vision or perfectly aligned eyes.
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MANN



Posts : 22
Join date : 2009-09-25

PostSubject: Re: Astigmatism   Tue Oct 06, 2009 11:23 am

What if you contemplated the surgery and decided not to go through with it after all due to the risks? Would you be able to see today?

What if something had gone wrong in the procedure? What would have been your parents' reactions? Your reaction?
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maryshelley



Posts : 44
Join date : 2009-09-22

PostSubject: Re: Astigmatism   Tue Oct 06, 2009 11:26 am

very interesting, fascinating even, but difficult to respond to. what if the operation wasn't successful? no, that's not the question that needs to be asked here. what if you met someone in the hospital who, um, I'm not sure... who had the same operation but it didn't turn out successfully? I don't know! this is really tough. I'll move on for now and check back later.
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AHSE Capstone

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Posts : 58
Join date : 2009-09-22

PostSubject: Re: Astigmatism   Tue Oct 06, 2009 11:31 am

What if instead of astigmatism, you had stigmata?
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your father



Posts : 18
Join date : 2009-09-23

PostSubject: Re: Astigmatism   Tue Oct 06, 2009 11:41 am

what if one the doctor had gotten confused and cut your tongue?
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Petrakan (Pet)



Posts : 19
Join date : 2009-09-22

PostSubject: Re: Astigmatism   Tue Oct 06, 2009 11:43 am

What if, when you came out of the surgery all bound up, you misunderstood the doctors, thought you really were blind, and threw a tantrum? Did the tantrum have any physical repercussions? Did you ruin your one chance to see? Did you hurt someone else? Did you try suicide? Did you tear the bandages off too early (in your rage and fear) and discover _______ ?
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AHSE Capstone

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Posts : 58
Join date : 2009-09-22

PostSubject: Re: Astigmatism   Tue Oct 06, 2009 11:45 am

But what if you have laser eye vision?

Not even what if. I bet you're trying it right now. I expect the table to be full of burn marks by noon
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Mike240



Posts : 38
Join date : 2009-09-22

PostSubject: Re: Astigmatism   Tue Oct 06, 2009 11:47 am

What if this were the opening to a hilarious pornographic film you once saw in a French theater, while studying to be a film major?
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Alis grave nil, pax



Posts : 25
Join date : 2009-09-22

PostSubject: Re: Astigmatism   Fri Oct 09, 2009 11:57 am

Mariah Dunn
Creative Writing
10/8/09

Dreaming in Color

I have had a high astigmatism my entire life, and in fifth grade my doctors decided that it was time for surgery to aid in the proper growth of my eyes. I remember turning 13 a month before I had the pre-op meeting, and therefore I was no longer considered a child. I had to go to a “grown-up meeting.”
That meeting changed me. Everything seemed reasonable for the first part. I would go in for surgery on a Tues. I couldn’t eat anything for 12 hours before, which meant no mash potatoes for dinner of waffles for breakfast. This fasting of sorts was so that I wouldn’t alter the results of the anesthesia. I would have to take a few weeks off from school, which at age 13 was rather thrilling because it meant no homework and some free time. The part that came after that were a list of the side effects; I should have straighter eyes after the operation, but there was a possibility that something could go wrong and my vision might decrease to the point of being legally blind. This part hit me like a ton of bricks. Honestly, I felt so queasy I wanted to vomit… but I didn’t. When I walked out of the room and for that matter for the weeks preceding the operation, I looked at everything and anything. I tried to make sure I took it all in just in case it was the last time I would see it.
I watched the clock tick slowly in class, the water drip from the faucet and the waves crashing. I observed sunsets from start to finish and the leaves in all their glory of fall. Sometimes I would go outside late at night to stare at the moon and stars just in case it was my last time with them. It seemed like each second I had was a precious gift, and that gift could possibly be short-lived.
I appreciated and valued life more than I had ever done in my past during the previous month before surgery. I tried to see it all. The simple things I might miss if something went wrong. I tried to spend time with my friends, to look at their faces, to appreciate their smiles. I remember sitting outside once for a few hours, just to watch the rain fall. Everything seemed more important, more valuable.
This surgery could potentially help me; my eyes would be more aligned, and it would certainly aid my vision. I knew it was something I should do, and really had to do. I would go through with it whether I was scared out not. They told me the risk was minimal, that I would be fine.
The surgery itself took 3 hours. I don’t remember any of it, but I do remember waking up from it, groggy with my head completely bound like a mummy. They had put stitches in my eye, which was the hardest thing to deal with. It felt like there were tiny grains of itchy sand in my eye that were un-removable and was not suppose to be rubbed.
When the bandages came off I was afraid to open my eyes. I was afraid something would go wrong. I sat with them closed, hoping, praying that my worries were unnecessary. That the month of heightened awareness of sight was needless, and that I would have my vision for the rest of my life.
The darkness was scary at first. I screamed, and then I cried. I asked the doctors “Would I ever see again.” If I could only see their facial expressions, but no, they had to tell be face to face even though I couldn’t see. They had to tell me that the 1 out of 1000 risk factor that had been mentioned in the pre-op meeting could actually happen. I never wanted it to be me. I loved the colors, I loved them all. When I was asked what is your favorite color I would always just reply with “the rainbow.”
Life goes on; but on in black and white, with sounds, smells, textures, tastes. I am glad I had that month of vivid alertness, and that I took that time to see it while I could. I miss it though. I miss it so very much.
I do have one very special gift though; a retreat of sorts. Because I used to see and because I still remember the world around me, what it is suppose to look like anyway, I dream. I dream in color. I dream about the things I have seen and the things I imagine I should be seeing. When I dream I have eyes that work, eyes that can see everything clearly and in focus. Dreams are like my portal, back into the world I was once a part of.
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